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Inauguration of first and largest particular comprehensive system of C++ in Iran

What is iostream.ir? This is a project which is found in Nanosoft corporation to bring us all together around C++ programing language schemes in Iran.


Inauguration of first and largest particular comprehensive system of C++ in Iran

for more information click here to change the language.


Official website for this project is: https://iostream.ir

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The new modern C++ era has begun!


The new modern C++ era has begun!

Final information about the features of new version coming soon.

Tags: C++, era, c++17

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Unveiling of new Logo

Unveiling of new Logo

Tags: Logo

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Get $149 worth of photo editing tools free from Google right now

Would you like to get $149 of photo-editing software for free right now? Of course you would! And you’re in luck because Google has made its premium Nik Collection photography software completely free to download and use. The software, which is normally priced at $149, was acquired by Google in 2012 and it features a wide array of photo editing tools that will make your pictures look like they were taken by a professional.


Get $149 worth of photo editing tools free from Google right now

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Scientists push a record 57Gbps through fiber optic lines

Need proof that the limits of fiber optic technology have been shattered? You just got it. University of Illinois researchers report that they've set a record for fiber data transmission, delivering 57Gbps of error-free data. And importantly, they sent the data at room temperature -- they didn't have to cool things down to keep those bits going. Even when things got toasty (185F), the technology could still deliver a brisk 50Gbps.


Scientists push a record 57Gbps through fiber optic lines

The scientists currently expect the technology to get the most use in data centers, aircraft and other places where you need to shuffle a ton of information across relatively short hops in unforgiving conditions. The real challenge might be getting it to work across long distances. If that's practical, the internet could get considerably more headroom and increase the likelihood that your 4K video streams arrive without a hitch.

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C++ standards meeting in Jacksonville

Here’s a summary of what happened, with some details about the current ISO C++ process so you can see just how the work is progressing and getting released. I’ve tried to add some links to the relevant feature design papers, or to the papers that summarize what was done which in turn usually carry more links to the design papers.


C++ standards meeting in Jacksonville

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Milky Way Galaxy: Facts About Our Galactic Home


Milky Way Galaxy: Facts About Our Galactic Home

The Milky Way galaxy is most significant to humans because it is home sweet home. But when it comes down to it, our galaxy is a typical barred spiral, much like billions of other galaxies in the universe. Let's take a look at the Milky Way.

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The Internet is running out of room (for IPv4)


The Internet is running out of room (for IPv4)

The Internet is running out of addresses, and adding new domain names and suffixes isn't going to help. The resource we are on the verge of eclipsing is Internet protocol, or IP addresses. When the internet was first put to use in the 1980's, engineers created IPv4, which has an upper limit of 4.3 billion different IP addresses. We've almost accounted for them all. According to the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN), only 3.4 million IP addresses are still available from the 1.3 billion IP addresses allotted to North America.

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Earth's 8 Biggest Mysteries


Earth's 8 Biggest Mysteries

  • Why are we all wet?
Scientists think Earth was a dry rock after it coalesced 4.5 billion years ago. So where did this essential chemical, H2O, come from? Perhaps an interstellar delivery system, in the form of massive impacts about 4 billion years ago. Pummeled by icy asteroids, the Earth could havereplenished its water reservoirs during the period, called the Late Heavy Bombardment. But the beginnings of Earth's water are shrouded in mystery because so little rock evidence remains from this time period , if you want to get more information please follow us.
 
Tags: earth, Life, Moon

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This is the flag we'll plant when we conquer an alien planet


This is the flag we'll plant when we conquer an alien planet

Are you excited for the day when a benevolent global government rules over the Earth and all humans are united in pursuit of ambitious scientific and technological goals like exploring the depths of our solar system and staking claim over other planets? Do you at least think it'd be cool if astronauts started planting flags on extraterrestrial bodies in the name of Earth, rather than the country that they come from? Maybe that day isn't in the immediate future, but graphic designer Oskar Pernefeldt has taken the time to imagine what that planetary flag might look like when it finally arrives.

In a project titled "The International Flag of Planet Earth," Pernefeldt mocks up a planetary flag and how it would appear in different uses, including sewn onto a space suit, planted on another planet, and held up in what one can only assume is a high-stakes interplanetary sporting event. The flag he designed is largely blue with a series of white, intersecting circles through the center. Pernefeldt went with a primarily blue flag to represent the overwhelming mass of water that covers Earth. The specific shade of blue was chosen with its display in space in mind — it's supposed to stand out well against both the white of a space suit and the black of space.

The seven intersecting rings, perhaps meant to symbolize the continents, are supposed to look like a flower, representing life on Earth. "The rings are linked to each other, which represents how everything on our planet, directly or indirectly, are linked," the project's website says. The flower also feel a bit like an extension of the Olympic rings, redesigned for a more global era. Although, you could probably argue that this part is a bit more of a stretch — the rings kind of echo Community's Greendale flag (it stands out a bit more when you watch them all come together in the project's design video). This is by no means the first flag made for the Earth, but the mockups do a good job of depicting a simple future when such a flag might actually be used. You can see all of the images below.

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Ubuntu 15.04 Launches With Support For OpenStack

Canonical today announced that the next version of Ubuntu, 15.04 Vivid Vervet, will be available for download on Thursday. This release introduces a couple of new features for desktop users, but most of the important updates center around server deployments.


Ubuntu 15.04 Launches With Support For OpenStack

 

Tags: OS, Linux, Ubuntu

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15 programming languages you need to know in 2015

If you're a programmer, these are good times. Jobs in the segment are projected to grow 8% over the next seven years, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. If you're a hotshot coder, you can make up to $300 an hour or more. Those at the high end of the pay scale have mastered the languages that are most in demand. Which are those? We asked Doug Winnie, director of content for online learning platform Lynda. Here's his assessment.


15 programming languages you need to know in 2015

Tags: C++, C#, C, Ruby, Java, Php

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43Tbps over a single fiber: World’s fastest network would let you download a movie in 0.2 seconds


43Tbps over a single fiber: World’s fastest network would let you download a movie in 0.2 seconds

A research group at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), which was the first to break the one-terabit barrier in 2009, has today managed to squeeze 43 terabits per second over a single optical fiber with just one laser transmitter. In a more user-friendly unit, 43Tbps is equivalent to a transfer rate of around 5.4 terabytes per second — or 5,375 gigabytes to be exact. Yes, if you had your hands on DTU’s new fiber-optic network, you could transfer the entire contents of your 1TB hard drive in a fifth of a second — or, to put it another way, a 1GB DVD rip in 0.2 seconds.

The previous record over a single optical fiber — 26 terabits per second, set by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology way back in 2011 — had remained unbroken for a surprisingly long period of time. DTU set a series of single-fiber world records in 2009 and 2011, but had since been forced to sit in Karlsruhe’s shadow — until now. This was obviously a pain point for the DTU researchers — the press release [Danish] announcing the new world record actually calls out Karlsruhe by name. I guess a bit of friendly competition never hurt anyone though, right?

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Intel SSD 750 Series PCIe and SATA SSD Announced

Intel unveils the Intel Solid-State Drive 750 Series, its highest performing SSD for use in client PC storage devices and workstations. The 750 series delivers greater than four times the performance of SATA-based SSDs by utilizing four lanes of PCIe 3.0 and the NVM Express (NVMe) standard. 


Intel SSD 750 Series PCIe and SATA SSD Announced

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You'll soon get 10TB SSDs thanks to new memory tech


You'll soon get 10TB SSDs thanks to new memory tech

SSDs and other flash memory devices will soon get cheaper and larger thanks to big announcements from Toshiba and Intel. Both companies revealed new "3D NAND" memory chips that are stacked in layers to pack in more data, unlike single-plane chips currently used. Toshiba said that it's created the world's first 48-layer NAND, yielding a 16GB chip with boosted speeds and reliability. The Japanese company invented flash memory in the first place and has the smallest NAND cells in the world at 15nm. Toshiba is now giving manufacturers engineering samples, but products using the new chips won't arrive for another year or so.

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Google Urging Firefox Users to Switch Default Search Engine: Report

Firefox users in the US that do not have Google set as their default search engine in the browser are reportedly seeing a big request box in their Google Search results that asks them to choose Google instead. Notably, Firefox partnered Yahoo last year to make the Google rival its default search engine in the US.


Google Urging Firefox Users to Switch Default Search Engine: Report

First spotted by Search Engine Land, Google has placed a big message above its search results asking Firefox users to switch to Google as the browser's default search engine. The message shown in a screenshot above states "Switch your default search engine to Google" along with "Learn how" and "No, thanks" options. The move has been termed as a desperate attempt by Google to attract Firefox users. The request box is not visible in India.

The report adds that since the Firefox-Yahoo deal in November last year, Yahoo's search share rose from 8.6 percent in November to 10.9 percent in January, citing StatCounter figures. According to the same firm, Firefox has a market share of 16 percent in the US. As per comScore, Yahoo's market share in the US rose from 10.2 percent in November last year to 11.8 percent in December.

In November, at the time of Firefox-Yahoo deal, Mozilla's chief Chris Beard stated that "We are adopting a more local and flexible approach to increase choice and innovation on the Web, with new and expanded search partnerships by country." The decision to switch to Yahoo came as a decade-long agreement with Google neared its end and Mozilla evaluated its options, he said. The partnership with Yahoo is set to last five years.

Google lately has been concentrating on improving the mobile experience for users. Last month the search giant added a new 'carousel' feature in its search service, which presents recent articles, videos and more when searching for topics or websites. Users on searching a desired topic or a website through the Google Search app or via Google Chrome, can scroll down to see a 'carousel' of recent articles, videos or more on that subject or from that website.

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